Dental Checkups and Teen Invisalign: Why Now is the Time to Act!

2021-07-14T17:38:04+00:00July 13th, 2021|Adam Brown DDS, Teeth Cleaning|

Summer Checkup and Invisalign Charlotte

Our kids have been out of school long enough. After more than a year of shut-downs, unpredictable schedules, and online courses, it’s time to get them back into the flow of education. And you want to make sure your child doesn’t miss a thing during this upcoming school year!

That’s why now is the time to schedule their dental checkup. And if you have a teen who needs some general alignment treatment, this could also be the perfect opportunity to explore Invisalign.

We know—you already have a lot on your plate. To ease your load a little, we’ve provided some practical information and answers to common questions about back-to-school dental checkups and Invisalign:

 

Top Reasons for Scheduling Now

Why is it a good idea to schedule your child’s dental appointment now instead of, say, a few months down the road? There are many reasons. Here are just a few of them:

Flexibility of Schedule

As soon as your child begins the school year, you’re going to have tons to do and limited time to do it. Carpools, homework, extracurricular activities, and other commitments that come with the school year can fill your schedule up and seriously raise your stress levels. Add another appointment to your to-do list, and it can become downright overwhelming. Typically, the summertime is more relaxed both for families and dentists. By scheduling a checkup now, you can bypass the stress.

Catching Problems Early

The sooner you identify potential dental issues, the better. Bringing your child to the dentist every six months for a cleaning is critical for their dental health. But the examination part of a checkup is just as important.

During an appointment, your child’s dentist will conduct a thorough evaluation of their dental health. This includes looking for chips, cracks, and early signs of cavities, tooth decay, and other problems. A routine visit can save your child from painful dental procedures as well as prevent you from getting hit with an expensive medical bill.

Better Concentration

For many kids, staying focused through class and homework assignments is hard enough. But if your child has a dental issue, it can throw their concentration off even more. Think about it—would you be able to stay focused on the task at hand if you had a throbbing toothache or a relentless sharp pain in your mouth? By getting your child checked out over the summer, it will help them concentrate and lower the risk of them having to miss class for an emergency dental appointment.

 

Oral Health Maintenance

Every aspect of a dental checkup is meant to promote your child’s overall oral health. Thorough cleaning and fluoride treatment can do wonders for preventing cavities, decay, and other serious issues. If your dentist thinks it is necessary, sealant treatment can provide additional protection.

But there’s another factor to consider: A lot of parents find it challenging to get their children to maintain oral hygiene at home. And your child’s dentist can provide them with compelling information that stresses the importance of oral hygiene. Moreover, the dentist can give you and your child personalized tips for brushing, flossing, and other hygienic practices.

 

Questions to Ask the Dentist

OK, so you’ve been convinced to schedule your child’s dental checkup sooner than later. That’s good. Now, you just have to prepare to get the most out of your visit. Here are a few questions to ask your child’s dentist during the appointment:

Will there be a cleaning today?

Cleaning is to be expected during any checkup. But just to be safe, confirm with your child’s dentist that there will be a cleaning. This is critical. No matter how well or often your child brushes, it’s not possible for them to remove all of the cavity-causing bacteria from their mouth. Getting a professional cleaning is one of the most fundamental steps they can take toward good oral health.

Does my child need sealants?

Fabricated from plastic or other dental materials, sealants are thin, protective coatings that can be placed on your child’s permanent back teeth. While these are no substitute for hygienic practices like brushing and flossing, they can go a long way in preventing bacteria and food particles from settling into the nooks and crannies of your child’s teeth. Sealants are particularly effective at preventing cavities and stopping the progression of existing spots of tooth decay.

It’s best practice to apply sealants as soon as possible after your child’s permanent molars come in. But they can still help teenagers and even adults. Since sealants reduce the risk of cavities by 80%, it’s definitely something worth asking the dentist about.

Does my child need an x-ray?

Your child won’t need to get an x-ray at every checkup. Still yet, it won’t hurt to ask the dentist about it each time. X-rays help your child’s dentist see the big picture of how your child’s teeth are developing, and they provide a clear picture of root health. Furthermore, x-rays can reveal tooth decay that may otherwise go unnoticed.

Will you assess my child’s mouthguard?

If your child wears a mouthguard for sports, you will want to bring the mouthguard in at each checkup. Your child’s dentist can assess the wear and tear of the mouthguard, as well as how well it fits in your child’s mouth. This is especially critical if your child is going through a growth spurt or getting new teeth; in these cases, you may need to get the mouthguard reformed.

Do you have any general suggestions for improvements?

The primary focus of a dental checkup is to look at overall dental health. The dentist will take an in-depth assessment of your child’s teeth and gums to ensure that the teeth are lining up correctly, that the bite is in good shape, and that no serious issues are on the horizon. If you have any concerns about your child’s dental health routine at home, be sure to ask for suggestions from the dentist as to how you can help improve it.

Is It Time for Your Teen to Start Invisalign?

Life is difficult enough for teenagers. Attaching a bunch of metal brackets to their teeth is sort of like adding insult to injury! Thankfully, braces are no longer the most popular or effective solution for correcting a teenager’s misaligned teeth or bad bite. Invisalign aligners have made many strides over the years and are now the go-to treatment for common alignment problems. Don’t know much about this product? Read on to get the gist!

What Exactly is Invisalign?

Invisalign is a brand of aligners that gradually move your teeth into their correct places. Much like braces, these aligners apply pressure on designated areas. However, unlike braces, Invisalign aligners are completely clear, and they are also removable (like retainers).

When you order Invisalign, the dentist will send measurements and molds of your teen’s mouth to a lab that will custom-fabricate a tray of aligners to fit their teeth perfectly. This process will occur several times, and each tray of aligners will be manufactured slightly straighter than the one before it.

As with other orthodontic devices and procedures, the Invisalign process is an investment. As such, it’s not something to be done via trial and error. At Adam Brown DDS, we will conduct a thorough consultation with your teen to ensure that they are a good candidate for clear aligners.

 

The Benefits

If your teen has misalignment issues in their teeth, jaw, or both, correcting those issues with Invisalign could yield a plethora of benefits. Here are a few key benefits to keep in mind:

• Self-Confidence

Your teen’s self-confidence will remain intact when using Invisalign. It’s truly a win-win situation; they get all the benefits of wearing traditional braces, but rather than chunks of metal, their clear aligners are essentially invisible! What’s more, as your teen’s teeth and bite are corrected, their self-confidence will likely increase.

• Comfort

Cuts and irritation in the mouth are common with braces. These issues don’t occur as often with Invisalign. If your teen experiences sharp edges and corners while wearing the aligners, the dentist can shave them down. Plus, your teen’s aligners will be custom-trimmed to fit their gum line, which will reduce the risk of irritation and discomfort. The comfort of Invisalign aligners can help your teen stay focused and succeed in school, work, and extracurricular activities.

• Few Dietary Changes

Anyone who has ever had braces can attest to the dietary restrictions involved. There are countless foods, snacks, and beverages that can cause damage to traditional braces. With Invisalign, there’s really no limit to what you can eat and drink. That said, it’s critical that your teeth and gums are kept clean; otherwise, the aligners themselves will not be clean.

There is one caveat, however. Your teen should never eat or drink anything (besides water) without first removing their aligners. Once they are finished eating or drinking, they will need to put their aligners back in. If you want to ensure the healthiest process possible, encourage your teen to brush their teeth before reinserting the aligners.

 

Common Questions About Invisalign

Finally, most parents have their fair share of questions concerning Invisalign. To help you get a better idea of whether or not clear aligners are the right solution for your teen, consider the answers to these common questions:

Why not traditional braces?

If your teen wears the aligners as their trained dentist recommends, Invisalign Teen can be every bit as effective as traditional braces for correcting common alignment issues. There are many problems and obstacles associated with the metal brackets and wires of braces. Invisalign aligners are easily removable, which means that your teen can play sports and engage in other activities without having to worry about damaging their braces or mouth.

How can I ensure my teen wears the aligners?

Parents of even the most responsible teenagers may be concerned about a lack of structure and routine. After all, you don’t want to make a significant investment if you’re not confident that your teen will wear their aligners as recommended (22 hours a day is standard).

Fortunately, Invisalign aligners have a unique feature called “compliance indicators,” which are essentially blue dots that disappear when your teen is wearing the aligners according to their treatment recommendations. If the blue dots are present at your teen’s next checkup, it will notify you and the dentist that your teen hasn’t been wearing the aligners appropriately.

What if an aligner gets lost?

Teenagers (and adults, for that matter) lose things. If your teen loses their aligners, no problem! Invisalign will provide up to six free replacement aligners. All you have to do is notify your dentist so the new aligners can be ordered.

 

Conclusion

Just because the world stopped for the pandemic doesn’t mean that your child’s dental health should slide! Reduce your stress and gain peace of mind by scheduling your child a checkup at Adam Brown DDS this summer. That way, you will know that you are fostering their health without having to take them out of school. And if you’re interested in starting Invisalign treatment for your teen, be sure to ask our office about that as well!

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Electric Toothbrushes: Are They Worth the Hype?

2020-06-11T13:22:25+00:00August 8th, 2019|Carolina's Dental Choice, Dentist Office Monroe NC, Teeth Cleaning|

At Carolina’s Dental Choice, we think the most important thing is to brush and floss regularly. Beyond that, we do believe there are some excellent advantages to owning an electric toothbrush.

 

Before you rush out to buy one, let’s review some of the details.

What the Studies Show

A review of studies done by the Cochrane Library in 2014 showed that “Powered toothbrushes reduce plaque and gingivitis more than manual toothbrushing in the short and long term.” Below you will find key results of the controlled studies where manual and electric toothbrushes were compared.

·    At one to three months of use, there was an 11% reduction in plaque when using the electric brush.

·    After using an electric toothbrush for over three months, there was a 21% reduction in plaque.

·    At one to three months, there was a 6% reduction in gingivitis (with the electric).

·    After three months, there was an 11% reduction (also with the electric).

Though the old-fashion toothbrush has done the job of keeping our teeth and gums clean for years, the electric toothbrush is the future of oral care. There is no denying an electric toothbrush is better at removing plaque and gingivitis. And, there are even more benefits to the electric toothbrush than these.

 

Under Pressure

When we brush, it’s natural to feel the need to apply extra pressure in order to scrub our teeth clean. Unfortunately, we tend to use too much force, which may result in pushing our gums back (in addition to scraping the enamel off our teeth). This little bit of extra pressure exposes the pink membrane that covers the roots of the teeth. Eventually, once the roots of the teeth become exposed due to heavy brushing, they become susceptible to decay and disease. Even worse, once the gums have receded, it is difficult to get them back, often requiring painful surgery with long recovery time. The better solution is to use a brush that knows when you are applying too much pressure so your gums can remain healthy and intact.

Recent studies show that when we use an electric toothbrush, we become more focused on the process of brushing, and therefore apply less pressure.

A side benefit of electric brushing is the unfamiliarity of the appliance requires more attention from our brain; therefore, we pay closer attention to the process of dental care.

Ease of Use May Be Better for Seniors, Impaired and Children

Should children use electric toothbrushes?Another benefit to using an electric toothbrush is that it works much better for those with limited mobility.

With over three million cases cited each year, carpal tunnel—a painful syndrome that restricts mobility in the wrist—can make brushing painful. But with an electric toothbrush, you use your wrists much less. Just turn it on and let the bristles do the work.

Seniors with arthritis in their hands or limited shoulder mobility find electric brushes more comfortable to use.

An electric brush is also beneficial for youngsters. Once they reach the age where they begin to brush themselves, parents often find themselves re-brushing to hit all the missed spots. Children that use electric toothbrushes tend to brush more teeth and do a better job cleaning them, which leaves less work for mom and dad.

It’s a great training tool for kids because most electric toothbrushes have a pressure sensor that lets you know when you are, indeed, pressing too hard. Beginners hear the beep and are better able to find the right level of pressure to apply.

The Cost

One of the biggest (if not the biggest) deterrents people offer for not switching to an electric toothbrush is the perceived high price they often carry. The truth is that issues with gums due to manual brushing and trips to the dentist are way more costly in the end. We definitely believe they are worth investment, but to be thorough, we have broken down the cost factors to that our clients may make an educated choice.

We considered the cost of buying new heads and batteries in our research.

Let’s start by looking at the initial cost according to the level of toothbrush:

·    A basic battery-operated, vibrating toothbrush costs between $5-$25. Now, this price might not seem very high, but to be honest, there’s not much of a difference between electric brushes at this base level and a standard toothbrush. These cheap electrics vibrate only, no oscillating. When it comes to electric toothbrushes, there is some truth to the notion, “you get what you pay for.”

·    The next level up gets you a much more effective toothbrush, but it will cost you anywhere from $75 to $200. Yep, there’s that high price. But, at this level of brush, you will reap the benefits. Plus, depending on the brand of brush you buy, there are additional benefits, such as a timer included in the handle letting you know when to begin and stop brushing; pressure sensors that indicate when you are pressing too hard; a digital reminder letting you know when to replace the brush head; varying brushing modes, and more. This is the level most of us find ourselves shopping. Anything less seems pointless.

·    The third level of brush may cost anywhere from $400-$1,000. These brushes include more capabilities, better construction, and materials used.

Now let’s have a look at the additional costs:

·    Typically, an electric brush head needs to be replaced every 2-3 months. These heads can cost anywhere from $5-$25, depending on the brand and style you have. Most heads can be ordered (in bulk for a discount) or may be found at your local grocery store.

·    If you have a brush that uses batteries, they will need to be replaced every 4 to 6 weeks. This, of course, adds up—but if you find yourself about to purchase a battery-operated toothbrush, chances are it falls into the first level of brush mentioned above, and therefore not any better than your old standard brush.

·    Plug-in brushes don’t require batteries, but they do depend on the power running through your house. The overall cost to charge your toothbrush is small.

When it comes to cost, it’s best to find the brand and style you feel most comfortable with first. Then look into each aspect of the price.

Vibrating or Oscillating? Vibrating or oscillating, which works better?

Vibrating or Oscillating Toothbrush

In a study done by the US Library of Medicine, where a 12-week comparison was done between the two types of brushes, the oscillating brush came out on top. The study specifically states, “The oscillating-rotating power brush provided statistically significantly superior reductions compared to the sonic brush…” and goes on to show the oscillating brush causes less bleeding and does a better job at reducing gingivitis and plaque.

Best Electric Toothbrushes for the Cost

In June of this year, The Strategist came out with a list of the “Best Electric Toothbrushes, According to Dentists,” and here are a few of the ones we liked the best:

Oral-B White Pro 1000 Power Rechargeable Electric Toothbrush ($50)

One of the biggest benefits to this brush is its ability to oscillate and vibrate. It also comes with a timer and pressure sensor and does not require batteries. This is a great way to break into the world of electric toothbrushes.

Oral-B 7000 SmartSeries Rechargeable Power Electric Toothbrush ($128)

This brush has all the capabilities as the Pro 1000, but it has an additional six cleaning modes—including one for your tongue. There is even Bluetooth connectivity so you can monitor and track your brushing habits with your phone. Another benefit to this brush is it uses smaller heads. This can help those who have smaller mouths and/or a sensitive gag reflex.

Philips Sonicare ProtectiveClean 4100 Plaque Control ($50)

Even though this brush does not have the circular, oscillating components it does still oscillate—it just does so as one solid piece, rather than multiple cylinders. It comes with a timer, pressure sensor, and naturally soft bristles. Users of this brush note how good the vibration feels, and that the toothbrush does an excellent job at breaking up tartar and plaque.

Philips Sonicare Diamond Clean Classic Electric Toothbrush ($178)

Much like the Oral-B 7000 Series, this brush is the higher-end version of the Philips 4100 Plaque Control. This brush comes with everything the 4100 has, with the addition of five different brushing modes such as “sensitive” and “gum care.” Users say this brush lasts longer, as it is made of high-quality materials, and that it provides that just-back-from-the-dentist level of teeth cleaning.

Overall, we find electric toothbrushes worth the switch. The cost is a bit more, but if you shop around you can often find them on sale. And, after trying different brushes, doing some research on the best brand for you, we think you will find that the most significant expense is the initial cost.

If you are considering changing to an electric toothbrush, feel free to come to talk with us at Carolina’s Dental Choice so we can help you get the best product possible.

 

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The ABC’s of Whitening Toothpaste

2020-07-16T16:54:54+00:00July 8th, 2019|Carolina's Dental Choice, Dental Trends, General, Oral Health, Teeth Cleaning, Teeth Whitening|

Teeth whitening is on the rise across the country. In 2018 alone, over 40.5 million people used some form of bleaching product to improve their smiles. Whitening toothpaste, in particular, is marketed as an affordable way to brighten your smile, but is it actually doing more harm than good?


    

A Brief History of Tooth Whitening

Despite its recent rise in popularity, you might be surprised to learn that the process of teeth whitening has been around for over 4,000 years. Egyptians were some of the first known people to follow the practice. They used ground pumice stone soaked in vinegar to improve their overall smiles. As time progressed, so did the methods. During the 1600’s people actually relied on their barbers to whiten their teeth in addition to cutting their hair. The barber would file the teeth down and then soak them in nitric acid as a way to whiten someone’s smile. Fluoride was discovered as a way to protect teeth in the early 19th century and toothpaste as we currently know it began to make its way to the public around 1945. Finally, in 1989, Rembrandt officially launched the first whitening toothpaste into the grocery market effectively empowering the general public to whiten their teeth with an affordable over-the-counter product.

Today there are hundreds of different brands of whitening toothpaste to choose from and not all are created equal. With everything from big names to natural alternatives vying for space on the shelves, it’s hard to know which path to take.

     

Understanding Extrinsic vs. Intrinsic Tooth Whitening

In order to understand how whitening toothpaste affects your smile, it’s helpful to first understand how the process of whitening works. When we observe stains on our teeth, we are generally seeing two types, extrinsic and intrinsic. Extrinsic stains are considered surface stains whereas intrinsic stains run deeper inside the tooth and are more difficult to remedy.

 

Causes of extrinsic stains include: Causes of intrinsic stains include:
Coffee or tea Tooth decay
Dark fruits such as blueberries and cherries Overuse of fluoride
Red wines Cracks/Scratches in enamel
Dark vegetables such as carrots and beets Genetics
Smoking or Chewing Tobacco Certain Antibiotics (Tetracycline based)
   

Over the counter products such as whitening toothpaste and strips are only strong enough to handle extrinsic stains. For intrinsic stains, it is recommended that you see a cosmetic dentist to learn more about safe, professional procedures that may be available to you.

 

How Whitening Toothpaste Works

Contrary to its name, one of the main ways whitening toothpaste works to remove stains is through abrasion. Tiny silica particles are added to the paste and are used to essentially “scratch” the stains off of your teeth. While this method may initially remove some of the discolorations, overuse can actually cause staining to become worse. This is because the abrasive material doesn’t just eliminate the tinge, it also scratches through the protective enamel. Loss of enamel can eventually lead to deeper, more permanent intrinsic staining. As the unprotected dentin becomes increasingly exposed to everyday food and drink, discoloration is able to penetrate past the surface and into the underlying layers of the tooth below.

In addition to abrasive particles, whitening toothpaste can also contain bleaching agents. The two most common bleaching agents used to whiten teeth in toothpaste include hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide. While these ingredients are shown to be effective at whitening teeth, they should always be used in moderation as overuse can lead to demineralization of your teeth and if swallowed, can potentially inflame your internal organs or cause internal bleeding.

 

Common Dental Issues that Arise From the Use of Whitening Toothpaste

Some common dental issues that arise when using whitening toothpaste include sensitivity, retracting gum lines, and even increased discoloration as the enamel breaks down and stains are able to penetrate to deeper levels inside the tooth.

Sensitivity – sensitivity can occur for a number of reasons. Some of these include overuse of whitening toothpaste, keeping the paste on your teeth for an extended period of time, and allowing the toothpaste to penetrate through cracks or openings that are exposing the inner dentin. It should be noted that it’s never a good thing to feel sensitivity from the use of whitening toothpaste. If you have this issue, stop using the toothpaste and consult with your dentist for alternative options.

Receding Gums – if whitening products aren’t used properly and in moderation, they can irritate the gums and cause them to recede. Receding gum lines are harmful for a number of reasons. Healthy oral tissue is important not only to help prevent your teeth from getting infected but also to protect the internal area of the tooth from negative exposure to bacteria and germs. When whitening toothpaste isn’t used properly, it can cause permanent damage to gum lines, causing them to recede, and eventually exposing the vulnerable dentin and root below.

Loss of Enamel both abrasive particles and bleaching agents can lead to a loss of enamel over time. It’s important to understand that enamel does not grow back so great care should be taken any time you choose to use a whitening product. Always consult with your dentist before using over-the-counter products so they can instruct on the safest way to achieve the results you want.

 

The Dangers of Children Using Whitening Toothpaste

While whitening toothpaste is problematic for adults, it can be even more detrimental to children. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends that all children under the age of 15 refrain from teeth whitening.  This is because a child’s enamel is thinner than an adult’s and the nerve and dentin on the inside of the tooth are still developing. Tooth enamel isn’t fully calcified until approximately two years after the permanent teeth finish emerging. The Pediatric Safety Organization warns of teenage use of whitening products in particular. Teenagers are at a greater risk for misuse and/or overuse because they tend to want to hasten or intensify the process without fully understanding the consequences. This can cause the developing teeth to become over-oxidized, resulting in a permanent breakdown of the teeth’s structure.

In general, improper use of these types of whitening products before a child’s smile is fully developed can result in increased sensitivity, demineralization of the enamel, and variations in tooth color. Children with braces or other mouth hardware are also at risk of uneven coloring to their teeth, as the portion of the tooth that is covered will not be affected by the whitener and will end up showing as a different shade from the exposed portions of the teeth.

 

Natural Alternatives to Traditional Teeth Whitening

Having whiter teeth doesn’t necessarily equate to a healthier smile. However, if you decide you want to brighten your smile using safer, more natural methods, you have a handful of options at your disposal.

Oil Pulling – oil pulling has been shown to have numerous benefits for oral health. In addition to killing the bacteria in your mouth that is responsible for plaque and gum disease, it also helps to reduce inflammation. Currently, there is no definitive evidence showing that oil pulling whitens teeth, however, many people who use the practice claim they notice a visible whitening of their teeth. Add to the fact that it’s a safe and beneficial method overall, and there’s really no reason not to give it a try to see if it works for you.

To try oil pulling, simply choose an oil of your choice (recommended options include coconut, olive, and sesame) and swish it around in your mouth for 5 to 20 minutes. You can also use a soft toothbrush to apply the oil or wipe it over your teeth with a washcloth.

Baking Soda – Sodium Bicarbonate, or baking soda as it is commonly called, is another natural product that can help to whiten your teeth. When used properly, it can reduce plaque, fight bad breath, help maintain a healthy pH inside your mouth, and assist in the overall whitening of your teeth. For the safest use with regards to oral health, it is recommended that you mix a teaspoon of baking soda with enough water to form a paste. Gently apply the mixture using either your finger or a soft toothbrush and let it sit on your teeth for approximately two minutes followed by a thorough rinse. You can apply this tincture multiple times per week for best results. Just be careful to apply gently as baking soda is abrasive and can harm your enamel if applied too strongly and too often.

Apple Cider Vinegar – apple cider vinegar is another effective way to help whiten your teeth. The reason vinegar works as a whitener is because it contains acetic acid which helps to remove the plaque and clean teeth. To use vinegar effectively as a whitener, mix one part vinegar with three parts water and swish in your mouth for about a minute. Be sure to spit it out once you’re finished. A couple of tips to remember when using Apple Cider Vinegar include:

 

  1. Always dilute the vinegar with water before swishing. Straight vinegar has a highly acidic pH and will damage the enamel on your teeth if overused.
  1. Only use organic brands of apple cider vinegar. This is because non-organic brands are typically pasteurized, which removes the majority of the beneficial properties contained in the vinegar.
  1. Be sure to wait at least 30 minutes before brushing your teeth after use. Residual vinegar remains on your teeth and can harm your enamel if you brush while it’s still present.

 

Brush and Rinse After Eating and Drinking – being vigilant about your teeth after eating and drinking can really make a difference in the amount of staining you accumulate over time. Make an effort, when possible, to brush your teeth after eating food and drink so that you can alleviate stains before they happen. If you drink coffee or other staining drinks, try to follow it up with a glass of water to help mitigate the effects. Regular coffee drinkers or smokers may also want to consider a visit to the dentist every three months instead of six to help keep their smile bright and healthy.

Naturally, one of the best ways to keep a sparkling, white smile is to take care of your teeth on a daily basis. Brush at least twice a day for two minutes at a time, floss regularly, and visit your dentist every six months. If you are interested in learning more about professional teeth whitening, please feel free to call our office. We’ll be happy to help answer any questions you might have and discuss how we can safely and effectively help you to achieve a brighter, whiter smile.

 

– Julie Mastbrook

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Works Cited

 

“Apple Cider Vinegar Teeth Whitening: Can You Safely Use Apple Cider Vinegar to Whiten Teeth?” Emergency Dentists USA, www.emergencydentistsusa.com/apple-cider-vinegar-teeth-whitening/.

 

“Apple Cider Vinegar vs. Organic Apple Cider Vinegar.” LIVESTRONG.COM, Leaf Group, www.livestrong.com/article/107959-apple-cider-vinegar-vs.-organic/.

 

Axe, Josh. “6 Ways to Naturally Whiten Your Teeth.” Dr. Axe, 9 Mar. 2018, draxe.com/6-ways-to-naturally-whiten-your-teeth/.

 

“History of Toothpaste – Toothbrush History.” History of Toothpaste – Toothbrush History, www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/basics/brushing-and-flossing/history-of-toothbrushes-and-toothpastes.

 

“Is Teeth Whitening Safe For Children?” Kids Dental Online – Plano & Carrollton, www.kidsdentalonline.com/dental-topics/teeth-whitening-safe-children/.

 

Lee, Sean S., et al. “Tooth Whitening in Children and Adolescents: A Literature Review.” American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, Pediatric Dentistry, 17 Aug. 2005, www.aapd.org/globalassets/media/publications/archives/lee-27-5.pdf.

 

Pesce, Nicole Lyn. “The Dark Side of Teeth-Whitening Strips.” MarketWatch, 10 Apr. 2019, www.marketwatch.com/story/the-dark-side-of-teeth-whitening-strips-2019-04-10.

“The Risks of Tooth Whitening Toothpastes | Winston Salem Dentist.” Distinctive Dental, 30 Nov. 2017, www.distinctivelydental.com/can-whitening-toothpastes-damage-teeth/.

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The Hidden Dangers of Mouthwash: What You Need to Know

2021-02-05T18:11:46+00:00June 5th, 2019|Carolina's Dental Choice, Dental Trends, Dentist Office Monroe NC, Oral Health, Teeth Cleaning, Teeth Whitening|

Mouthwash is often touted as a safe and effective method for curing bad breath and improving overall oral health. But recent studies show that not all mouthwashes are created equal. Before you add a mouthwash to your daily dental regimen, take a minute to understand some of the potential dangers that might be hiding in that morning and evening routine.

 

The Problems with Conventional Mouthwash

While advertising may state that conventional mouthwash kills 99.9% of all bacteria, that’s not always the full dental story. Many conventional types of mouthwash contain up to a 26% alcohol content in addition to other dangerous ingredients. When you swish mouthwash twice a day in your mouth for an extended period of time, a number of things occur.

  1. Alcohol destroys the friendly bacteria your body needs to maintain normal blood pressure and positive oral health. Think of it like an antibiotic for your mouth. It doesn’t distinguish between good and bad oral bacteria, it simply kills it all.
  2. Conventional mouthwash dries out your mouth and affects saliva production. This can actually result in worsened breath over time in addition to increased cavity production because saliva acts as a natural barrier for both of these dental conditions.
  3. Recent studies have shown that using conventional mouthwash may potentially lead to high blood pressure issues because of disruption with the body’s production of NO (Nitric Oxide), a molecule inside the body that helps to regulate blood pressure.

A sample of ingredients that are the biggest culprits for these dental issues include alcohol (associated with drying your mouth and killing bacteria), Chlorine Dioxide (used as a bleaching agent to whiten teeth), Chlorhexidine (an antiseptic that is also an allergen), and formaldehyde (dangers include cancer risk and respiratory problems).

 

Discovering Natural Mouthwash Alternatives

There are several natural mouthwash alternatives available over the counter that provide a safer option for those that want to maintain their daily swishing regimen. A few choices are listed below.

  1. The Natural Dentist
    This mouthwash can be found at most major retailers and is tailored towards those with sensitive teeth and gums. The ingredients are all natural and contain 20% Aloe Vera which is a natural antiseptic that replaces conventional use of Chlorhexidine without the side effects.
  2. Therabreath
    This mouthwash is also available at most major retailers and helps increase saliva production instead of drying out your mouth. It also uses natural ingredients including aloe vera and tea tree oil which is another natural antiseptic used to aid in overall oral health.
  3. Oral Essentials
    Created by dentists and thoroughly tested, this mouthwash contains sea salt to help maintain the healthy mineral balance in your mouth. In addition, you’ll find such natural ingredients as aloe vera, coconut oil (a natural teeth whitener), and essential oils (aids in freshening breath). This mouthwash can be found on Amazon in addition to other online retailers.

  

Do-It-Yourself Mouthwash? Why not!

A quick search on the internet for do-it-yourself mouthwash will yield plenty of recipes for you to experiment with. When wading through the never-ending list of oral options, keep a few essential ingredients in mind. 

  1. Aloe Vera
    As mentioned above, Aloe Vera is a top-notch replacement for the conventional mouthwash ingredient, Chlorhexidine. Studies have shown that it is equally as effective as an antiseptic but without all the harmful side effects.
  2. Essential Oils
    Essential Oils are a natural way to freshen breath without the drying effect of alcohol. They also contain antibacterial properties and oils such as lemon contain whitening properties to help keep your teeth shiny and bright.
  3. Sea Salt and Baking Soda
    Both these ingredients have strong benefits for oral health. Used as mouthwash ingredients, sea salt will help to restore the mineral balance of your mouth while baking soda will help to ease gingivitis and whiten teeth.

 

Final Thoughts on Mouthwash

Studies show that conventional mouthwashes are not as effective or as safe as typically advertised. They can contribute to dry mouth, mess with the balance of bacteria in your mouth and even cause increased gingivitis and cavity formation. The best way to keep your dental health in tip-top shape is to work on the problem from the inside out. Keep a balanced diet and stay away from processed foods and sugars. If you still want to make mouthwash a regular part of your dental routine, stick with all natural brands or create your own recipe so that you are in control of the ingredients going into your mouth and body.  For more information, please contact Carolina’s Dental Choice.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Diabetes & Dental Health

2020-07-16T17:22:42+00:00November 27th, 2018|Carolina's Dental Choice, General, Oral Health, Teeth Cleaning|

One in 10 Americans — or more than 30 million people — have diabetes, according to the Office of Disease Prevent and Health Promotion (healthfinder.gov). People with diabetes have an increased risk for serious gum disease because they are generally more susceptible to bacterial infection, and have a decreased ability to fight bacteria that invade the gums. These bacteria are what cause periodontal disease, a chronic, inflammatory condition that can destroy your gums, all the tissues holding your teeth, and even your bones. The American Dental Association states that periodontal disease is the most common dental disease among those living with diabetes, affecting nearly 22 percent of those diagnosed. In fact, one in five cases of total tooth loss is related to diabetes. 

Dental complications due to diabetes also include oral burning — a burning sensation inside the mouth that may include a bitter taste and dry mouth that is caused by uncontrolled blood glucose levels — and thrush — the growth of a naturally occurring fungus that the body is unable to control and may cause sore, white — or sometimes red — patches on your gums, tongue, cheeks, or the roof of your mouth.

November is American Diabetes Month, and Carolina’s Dental Choice wants to help you ensure that your efforts to manage the condition include your oral health.

Even if you don’t have diabetes now, that doesn’t mean that you never will. Or, if you’re not someone who regularly goes to the doctor, you could even have diabetes and not know it yet. Approximately 1.7 million new cases are diagnosed each year — and 8.1 million people living with diabetes don’t even know they have it. Another 84 million adults in the United States are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

HOW DIABETES WORKS

There are common misconceptions about diabetes. Diabetes is not simply caused by eating too much sugar. It is not a disease only seen in people who are overweight.

Diabetes is a disease in which the pancreas, a gland situated behind and below the stomach, does not properly produce the hormone insulin. What is supposed to happen is that when you eat food that food is digested in the stomach and broken down and converted into glucose, a type of sugar. That sugar is required for your body to function. The stomach and small intestines absorb the glucose and then release it into the bloodstream. Once in the bloodstream, glucose can be used immediately for energy or stored in our bodies, to be used later. However, in order to store the glucose for later, the body must have insulin. Think of it almost as if food is like going to work, cash is glucose, and your savings account and ability to retire is insulin. Without the savings account, all the cash gets spent!

HOW DIABETES DEVELOPS

It is thought a combination of genetic susceptibility and environmental factors cause type 1 diabetes though exactly what those factors are is still unclear. What’s known is that in type 1 diabetes, your immune system attacks and destroys your insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, leaving you with little or no insulin. Consequently, diabetes can be thought of as an autoimmune disease. You may be familiar with other autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease, or lupus.

It’s believed that genetic and environmental factors also play a role in the development of type 2 diabetes — although being overweight is strongly linked to the development of type 2 diabetes. In type 2 diabetes, your cells become resistant to the action of insulin, and your pancreas is unable to make enough insulin to overcome this resistance. 

RISK FACTORS FOR DIABETES

The Mayo Clinic outlines certain risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes:

  • Weight. The more fatty tissue you have, the more resistant your cells become to insulin.
  • Inactivity. The less active you are, the greater your risk. Physical activity helps you control your weight, uses up glucose as energy and makes your cells more sensitive to insulin.
  • Family history. Your risk increases if a parent or sibling has type 2 diabetes.
  • Race. Although it’s unclear why, people of certain races — including black people, Hispanics, American Indians and Asian-Americans — are at higher risk.
  • Age. Your risk increases as you get older. This may be because you tend to exercise less, lose muscle mass and gain weight as you age. But type 2 diabetes is also increasing among children, adolescents and younger adults.
  • Gestational diabetes. If you developed gestational diabetes when you were pregnant, your risk of developing prediabetes and type 2 diabetes later increases. If you gave birth to a baby weighing more than 9 pounds (4 kilograms), you’re also at risk of type 2 diabetes.
  • Polycystic ovary syndrome. For women, having polycystic ovary syndrome — a common condition characterized by irregular menstrual periods, excess hair growth and obesity — increases the risk of diabetes.
  • High blood pressure. Having blood pressure over 140/90 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) is linked to an increased risk of type 2 diabetes.
  • Abnormal cholesterol and triglyceride levels. If you have low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), or “good,” cholesterol, your risk of type 2 diabetes is higher. Triglycerides are another type of fat carried in the blood. People with high levels of triglycerides have an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Your doctor can let you know what your cholesterol and triglyceride levels are.

SYMPTOMS OF DIABETES

According to the Mayo Clinic, Type 1 diabetes can develop at any age, though it often appears during childhood or adolescence. Type 2 diabetes, the more common type, can develop at any age, though it’s more common in people older than 40.

Some of the signs and symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes are:

  • Increased thirst
  • Frequent urination
  • Extreme hunger
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Presence of ketones in the urine (ketones are a byproduct of the breakdown of muscle and fat that happens when there’s not enough available insulin)
  • Fatigue
  • Irritability
  • Blurred vision
  • Slow-healing sores
  • Frequent infections, such as gums or skin infections and vaginal infections

In addition to gum infections, you can look for other symptoms to show up in your mouth, if diabetes is left untreated, explains the American Dental Association.

  • You may have less saliva, causing your mouth to feel dry.
  • Because saliva protects your teeth, you’re also at a higher risk of cavities.
  • Gums may become inflamed and bleed often, which is called gingivitis.
  • You may have problems tasting food.
  • You may experience delayed wound healing (such as when you bite the inside of your cheek or have a tooth pulled).
  • You may be susceptible to infections inside of your mouth.
  • For children with diabetes, teeth may erupt at an age earlier than is typical.

Note that dry mouth isn’t just an annoyance. It can impact your oral health. Certain medications and other conditions can cause dry mouth, but symptoms include:

  • A sticky, dry feeling in the mouth
  • Trouble chewing, swallowing, tasting, or speaking
  • A burning feeling in the mouth
  • A dry feeling in the throat
  • Cracked lips
  • A dry, rough tongue
  • Mouth sores
  • An infection in the mouth
  • Bad breath

EFFECTS OF DIABETES

Most people have felt the short term effects of their blood sugar getting too high (hyperglycemia) or too low (hypoglycemia) such as when eating too much, being sick, experiencing a lot of stress, exercising too much, or not eating enough.

Early hyperglycemia may result in frequent urination, increased thirst, blurred vision, fatigue, and headaches. More severe hyperglycemia may include nausea, vomiting, dry mouth, shortness of breath, and abdominal pain.

Mild hypoglycemia can make you feel hungry or like you want to vomit. You could also feel jittery or nervous. Your heart may beat fast. You may sweat. Or your skin might turn cold and clammy. Moderate hypoglycemia often makes people feel short-tempered, nervous, afraid, or confused. Your vision may blur. You could also feel unsteady or have trouble walking. Severe hypoglycemia can cause you to pass out. You could have seizures. It could even cause a coma or death. If you’ve had hypoglycemia during the night, you may wake up tired or with a headache. And you may have nightmares. Or you may sweat so much during the night that your pajamas or sheets are damp when you wake up.

With diabetes it is not simply a matter of a person having only too much or only too little blood sugar, its that the body can not regulate blood sugar levels. Wild swings in blood sugar can have profound physical effects.

  • Cardiovascular disease. Diabetes dramatically increases the risk of various cardiovascular problems, including coronary artery disease with chest pain (angina), heart attack, stroke and narrowing of arteries (atherosclerosis). If you have diabetes, you’re more likely to have heart disease or stroke.
  • Nerve damage (neuropathy). Excess sugar can injure the walls of the tiny blood vessels (capillaries) that nourish your nerves, especially in your legs. This can cause tingling, numbness, burning or pain that usually begins at the tips of the toes or fingers and gradually spreads upward.
    Left untreated, you could lose all sense of feeling in the affected limbs. Damage to the nerves related to digestion can cause problems with nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or constipation. For men, it may lead to erectile dysfunction.
  • Kidney damage (nephropathy). The kidneys contain millions of tiny blood vessel clusters (glomeruli) that filter waste from your blood. Diabetes can damage this delicate filtering system. Severe damage can lead to kidney failure or irreversible end-stage kidney disease, which may require dialysis or a kidney transplant.
  • Eye damage (retinopathy). Diabetes can damage the blood vessels of the retina (diabetic retinopathy), potentially leading to blindness. Diabetes also increases the risk of other serious vision conditions, such as cataracts and glaucoma.
  • Foot damage. Nerve damage in the feet or poor blood flow to the feet increases the risk of various foot complications. Left untreated, cuts and blisters can develop serious infections, which often heal poorly. These infections may ultimately require toe, foot or leg amputation.
  • Skin conditions. Diabetes may leave you more susceptible to skin problems, including bacterial and fungal infections.
  • Hearing impairment. Hearing problems are more common in people with diabetes.
  • Alzheimer’s disease. Type 2 diabetes may increase the risk of dementia, such as Alzheimer’s disease. The poorer your blood sugar control, the greater the risk appears to be. Although there are theories as to how these disorders might be connected, none has yet been proved.
  • Depression. Depression symptoms are common in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Depression can affect diabetes management.

MANAGING & PREVENTING DIABETES

For a person with diabetes, the main focus of treatment is to control the amount of glucose in the body so that blood sugar levels stay as close to normal as possible.

Type 1 diabetes can’t be prevented. However, healthy lifestyle choices can help prevent type 2 diabetes.

  • Lose weight if you are overweight, and keep it off. You may be able to prevent or delay diabetes by losing 5 to 7 percent of your current weight.1 For instance, if you weigh 200 pounds, your goal would be to lose about 10 to 14 pounds.
  • Move more. Get at least 30 minutes of physical activity, such as walking, at least 5 days a week. If you have not been active, talk with your health care professional about which activities are best. Start slowly and build up to your goal.
  • Eat healthy foods. Eat smaller portions to reduce the amount of calories you eat each day and help you lose weight. Choosing foods with less fat is another way to reduce calories. Drink water instead of sweetened beverages.

For tips on living with diabetes and caring for your oral health, you can also download tips from the National Institute of Oral and Craniofacial Research:

Talk to your dental hygienist and dentist at Carolina’s Dental Choice, if you have diabetes or have been experiencing any of the oral symptoms of diabetes such as dry mouth, gingivitis, or trouble tasting food. We can make recommendations to help you best manage your oral health now and in the future.

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Teeth As Tools: How Our Teeth Have Been Used Throughout History

2018-11-05T14:35:48+00:00October 31st, 2018|Carolina's Dental Choice, Dental Trends, Teeth Cleaning|

Our teeth perform so many important functions throughout our life and on a daily basis. On a basic level, we use our teeth to talk, chew, digest food, and properly fill out our cheeks and lips to form our face shape. Without knowing it, you have probably used your teeth as tools in a multitude of ways. Whether you’re opening a bag of snacks by ripping open the seal with your teeth, cutting meat with your teeth, or holding bobby pins as you fix your hair, our teeth are one of the most important tools on our body.

While many of the ways that we use our teeth as tools aren’t particularly healthy for our teeth, and constantly put our teeth at the risk of damage, typically, a healthy tooth will not chip or break during normal function.

Now imagine a time and place where there were no electric toothbrushes, mouthwash, or even dental floss, and suddenly your teeth are one of the most important tools you possess. If teeth have less enamel, decay, or gum disease, they are more likely to chip, shift, or become loose, resulting in eventual tooth loss.

How have humans used their teeth throughout their history when they possibly weren’t as strong and healthy? What did it mean for humans to use their teeth as tools?

Early Ancestors: Teeth as Tools

Eating chocolate

Much of what we know about the life and diet of ancient humans is due to finding their teeth! Archaeologists find dozens to hundreds of teeth for every skeleton or skull. Why do our teeth survive at such high numbers? Our teeth are covered by enamel, which is 97 percent mineral, making our teeth stronger and more easily preserved than the rest of our bones. From the shape of the tooth to the thickness of the enamel, scientists can understand the evolution of humans, how our ancestors lived, what they ate, or even what diseases they had. Variations in teeth are a great way for scientists to classify early human species. As humans migrated across the globe, so did their diets; we know this because human teeth developed thicker enamel to eat other animals, seeds, nuts, and roots.

Looking back to Neanderthal teeth, scientists have hypothesized that they use their teeth as a tool, possibly gripping and clamping with their front teeth as they prepped animal hides for clothing and shelter.

What’s clear is that our teeth have evolved to serve us in similar ways as our ancestors. Like our ancestors, we use our teeth to access food or drink. Our teeth can still tell us a lot about our day-to-day life and culture as well!

Early tools to clean teeth

As far as we know, the earliest toothbrush dates back to around 3000BC, where Babylonians and Egyptians configured a toothbrush from frayed twigs. Fast forward a bit to 1600 BC, and we have the Chinese using aromatic twigs from trees as “chew sticks” to freshen their breath.
Some of the earliest tools to clean teeth were made from animal bone. For a stretch of history, and even today in certain parts of the world, coarse animal hair, such as hair from cows, was used to form the bristle on toothbrushes.

Did people in the past constantly have rotted teeth, cavities, and gum disease? Despite a lack of teeth brushing among ancient people, most people did not suffer from dental problems. There are a few explanations:

• The food being eaten was natural, unprocessed, and pure, containing nutrients and vitamins that strengthened teeth against bacteria
• Ancient diets were filled with fibrous foods, where the fiber acted as a brush against the teeth to filter away plaque and food
• Earlier diets lack sugary foods and acidic soda, two of the main detriments of modern diets
• Before cigarettes, humans didn’t smoke, and thus didn’t experience the harmful side effects of smoking on the teeth and human health

About 10,000 years ago at the dawn of the Neolithic period, our ancestors began farming, our teeth began to experience more decay, and dentistry emerged. As recent as the last decade, archaeologists found teeth that had been scraped and even drilled to possibly remove decayed tissue. With the onset of farming came carbohydrate-rich grains and starches. Some oral bacteria actually convert carbohydrates into enamel-destroying acids. There is evidence in numerous cultures across the world at various time periods where people combated decay by hand-drilling small holes into the teeth and scraping with different tools. At this point, you’re probably extremely thankful for the profound progress dentistry has made, even in the last century!

Cosmetic dentistry throughout history

It’s hard to pinpoint when improving the appearance of teeth became more fashionable rather than undergoing treatment to improve teeth function, but we know for sure that it has taken off in the past few years. Patients can now receive whitening treatments, veneers, and dental implants, all of which are cutting-edge procedures for a brighter, whiter smile! But cosmetic dentistry isn’t anything new—it goes back ancient times, where we know people developed tools to clean their teeth as early as 3000BC.
We’ve also been fixing our teeth since prehistoric times. Around 700 BC, there is evidence that Etruscans made dentures with ivory and bone, or constructed dentures from human or animal teeth. This practice lasted all the way up until the 1800s!

In 200 AD, the Etruscans also were using gold to create dental crowns and bridges, although it’s unknown whether this was for a dental treatment or for a fashion statement. The Ancient Egyptians used pumice stone and vinegar to create a toothpaste, and they hammered seashells into their gums as replacements for their teeth.

The 1700’s led to human teeth being used more commonly as dental implants, but our bodies tend to reject other humans’ teeth. In the late 1770’s, the first porcelain dentures were made, and they became extremely popular in the 19th century. By the early 20th century, dentists had switched to plastics and acrylics for dentures.

One of the most famous representations of cosmetic dentistry that comes to mind is that of the United States of America’s first president, George Washington. The legend surrounding Washington’s teeth was that they were made entirely of wood. But, in fact, they were actually made of animal bone!

How do our teeth become damaged from using them as tools in the present day and age?

Well, consider this: when we speak, our teeth are naturally separated during normal speech, and when we eat, food separates our teeth as we chew. When we use our teeth as tools, say to rip open a package or grind into tough foods, our teeth make contact, and suffer damage.

If your tooth has a filling or crown, using your teeth as tools they’re not intended for can pull out the filling or cause the crown to fall off. To those of you constantly holding bobby pins with your teeth to fix hair, bobby pins can actually pop off porcelain veneers on your teeth!

What does this have to do with our ancestors? Well, history repeats itself! We’re prone to using our strong, capable teeth as tools. Although we use our teeth as tools on a daily basis to eat, speak, and chew, improper use can lead to cracking and fracturing your teeth.

However progressive our dental care and habits are, we can truly damage our teeth. In comparison to the pain of damaging your teeth and the price of dental work, recognizing and changing our bad habits is better for our teeth and our wallets.

What if I already damaged my teeth?

You’re not alone if you didn’t know that using your teeth in certain, commonplace ways was damaging. What you should know, is that early treatment is always less extensive and less expensive. If a tooth suffers from minor cracks or chips, your dentist can easily repair them with a filling. If left untreated, these minor chips and cracks make the tooth weaker and more likely to break further, possibly chipping away at enamel and leaving the tooth exposed to bacteria.

Basically, the sooner you act with damaged teeth, the better for your wallet, your comfort, and the overall health of your teeth! Set up an appointment with Carolina Dental Choice to be proactive with your smile.

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Seven Ways To Get Your Smile Ready For Summer!

2020-07-16T17:11:15+00:00April 30th, 2017|Dental Bonding, Dental Crowns, Dental Implants, Fixed Bridges, Implants, Teeth Cleaning, Teeth Whitening, Veneers|

With a whole season of fun events ahead you’ll want to make sure you look your best. Whether you are posing for that summer beach picture or smiling at a wedding you want your teeth to look their best. Make an appointment at Carolina’s Dental Choice to have your teeth cleaned or perhaps get a quick fix for a problem tooth.

Teeth Whitening Wilmington

 

Here are quick ways to improve your smile for the summer:
1   Teeth Whitening
Do you drink several cups of coffee in the morning or eat foods that stain your teeth?  Dr. Vaghani or Dr. Luckhardt can remove those stains with a simple, inexpensive teeth whitening procedure within a few weeks.  Using a carbamide peroxide gel that stays active for up to 6 hours you should notice a dramatic difference within a day.  Our dentist use Opalescence tooth whiten gel.  It has a good track record and can safely be administered at home.  The gel can stay on for short periods of time or over night. Patients often find this form of teeth whitening easy to use. The Opalescence gel comes in three different flavors and prevents dehydration. The gel works by bleaching your teeth to get rid of stains or discoloration.
2   Teeth Cleaning
Sometimes all it takes is a deep clean to do the trick! A deep clean at Carolina’s Dental Choice is an easy way to give your teeth a lift and help prevent dental issues. It is recommended that patients make it a routine to have their teeth cleaned regularly.

During a routine clean, patient’s teeth are brushed diligently, flossed, and examined for cavities and other dental formalities. This teeth cleaning removes plaque and tar that form on the teeth that can be hard to see and difficult to remove. The dentist will clean each individual tooth and remove all unwanted materials on the tooth through brushing, flossing, scrapping, and special dental techniques.

3   Dental Crowns

Uneven teeth? Discolored teeth? Or a week tooth? That’s where dental crowns can help. Dental crowns are designed to help restore the shape, color, and strength of a tooth. This is a considerable option for dental and cosmetic reasons. One of our experienced dentists will examine your teeth to see if a dental crown is necessary and to identify which crown would bet fit your dental needs.  A dental crown is a tooth shaped, porcelain crown that goes over the tooth. This is best for weak teeth that are predicted to crack or break or for teeth that have already cracked. The dental crown can also help support dental bridges or be used for cosmetic purposes. 

As a bonus, most insurance companies cover dental crowns if the procedure is necessary.  

4   Veneers

Looking for that perfect Hollywood Smile?  Veneers are a great choice to cosmetically enhance your smile.  The veneer is a thin custom made cover that can be placed over the teeth. They are made of porcelain and look identical to natural teeth. The veneer is permanently bonded to your tooth to keep your smile looking great!

Veneers change the shape, size and color of your teeth.  First, a small portion of the original enamel is removed, this allows for room for the veneer to be placed on the tooth and function just like the natural tooth.  Veneers may even be placed on the same day with minimally prepped veneers. This type of veneer requires no enamel to be grinded down.

5   Implants

If you have thought about dental implants before, take a second look. This procedure and the products associated with it have changed dramatically over the last six months.  Implants are the latest innovation in cosmetic dentistry.  If you are missing a tooth or two dental implants are a recommended way to replace missing teeth. The implant is a permanent replacement that is durable and looks natural. It can also be an alternative to getting dentures. Dental implants are embedded into the jaw and covered with an artificial tooth that matches other teeth.

There are two types of dental implants; endosteal implants and subperiosteal implants. Endosteal implants are directly implanted through a surgical procedure that implants directly into the jawbone. After the gum tissue is healed another surgery is needed to connect a post to the original implant. After these surgeries have taken place am artificial tooth is placed on the post. The subperiosteal implants are metal frames that are placed on to the jawbone just below the gum tissue. When the gum heals, the frame is secured into the jawbone. Then a post is attached to the frame and an implant is attached.

6   Fixed Bridges

The fixed dental bridge is another method done at Carolina’s Dental Choice to help repair missing teeth. A fixed bridge is a procedure used to replace one or more missing teeth. A bridge consists of two or more crowns. These artificial teeth can be made using gold, alloys, porcelain, or a mixture. The bridges are supported by natural teeth or implants. Dental bridges have many benefits that can help you obtain the perfect smile, create a proper way of speaking and eating, create structure, and prevent teeth from moving out of place.

There are three main types of dental bridges; Traditional Bridges, Cantilever Bridges, and Maryland Bonded Bridges. Traditional Bridges uses a crown for the tooth or implant on either side of the missing tooth. This is the most often form of bridge and is usually mad in ceramics or a porcelain fused to metal. Cantilever bridges are used when there are adjacent teeth on one side only of the missing teeth. This is not a very common form of bridge. Finally, there is the Maryland Bonded Bridge, these are gums supported by a framework of metal or porcelain and use porcelain, porcelain fused to metal, or plastic teeth. The wings are often on one side of the bridge and bond to natural teeth.

7  Dental Bonding

Dental bonding is a very quick and easy way to repair teeth that have cavities, cracks, chips, or to alter the shape and size. Dental bonding is a one-trip visit that makes it quick and easy. The bond is very cost effective. The bond is done by using a tooth-colored resin that is a durable plastic material. The dental bond can last anywhere from three to ten years!

To book an appointment before your spring event call Carolina’s Dental Choice at 704-289-9519. Dr. Brown and his team of wonderful dental experts would love to help enhance your smile so you can be confident and smile with pride!

  

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